Services

Veterinary services for the pets of London, Ontario.

We’re here with you through every stage of your pet’s life.

Neighbourhood Pet Clinic offers a wide range of primary health care for your pet. Most of the pets we care for are cats and dogs, but if you have a different pet, like a bird, hedgehog or hamster, give us a call anyway. If we can’t help you, we’ll find somebody that can!

Dentistry

Talk to our team of veterinary professionals about preventing dental disease and keeping your pet’s teeth in great shape.

PERIODONTAL AND DENTAL DISEASE IN DOGS

Dogs tend to get Periodontal Disease – bone loss around the tooth root that isn’t always visible until an x-ray is taken. It’s caused by bacteria migrating down the tooth root and causes pain whenever they chew.

Approximately 80% of dogs over the age of 3 have dental disease in some form.

SIGNS OF DENTAL DISEASES

The first signs of dental disease, such as stinky breath or discoloured teeth, can seem harmless. However, oral health is closely related to your dog’s overall health.

  • Plaque build up leads to bad breath…

  • Bacteria in plaque causes inflammation of the gums, leading to gum disease/pain/tooth loss…

  • Bacteria enters the blood stream through the inflamed gums. It travels through the bloodstream to vital organs, leading to heart/liver/kidney disease.

IS MY DOG AT RISK?

Dental disease is more common in older pets, but prevention can start young. With a bit of patience, many dogs learn to love getting their teeth brushed and look forward to the tasty toothpaste or a yummy reward.

Breed can also play a role in the development of dental disease. Smaller dogs and dogs with flat faces/short noses are more likely to have crowding issues, and as a result, the teeth are harder to clean. Your veterinarian can recommend an in-clinic dental cleaning to thoroughly clean spots that a toothbrush can’t reach.

HOW TO PREVENT DENTAL DISEASES

While especially important for short-nosed breeds, dental cleanings play a big role in the health of your furry family member. In-clinic cleanings increase your pet’s quality of life by preventing the pain and tooth loss associated with dental disease. Just like when humans go to the dentist, we also take dental X-rays which give us a more complete picture of your pet’s oral health.

One of the easiest ways to prevent dental disease is to try a diet with a dental focus. There are many products available that have been specifically formulated to remove plaque through the physical motion of chewing, unlike traditional foods which are more likely to cause plaque than remove it.

Whether you introduce your pup to dental dog food or simply supplement his or her existing diet with dental treats, your dog’s teeth will thank you! Not only might you notice a difference in the appearance of the teeth, but the whole family can enjoy your furry friend’s fresher breath!

DENTAL DISEASE IN CATS

Cats can get red dots on their teeth at the gumlines that, like cavities, are small and painful. They also are prone to Gingivitis, which can be cleared up with a dental cleaning.

70% of cats over 3 years of age have dental disease in some form.

The first signs of dental disease, such as stinky breath or discoloured teeth, can seem harmless. However, poor oral health may progress to cause pain and tooth loss.

IS MY CAT AT RISK?

Dental disease is more common in older pets, but prevention can start young. With a bit of patience, many cats learn to love getting their teeth brushed and look forward to the tasty toothpaste or a yummy reward.

Breed can also play a role in the development of dental disease. Persians and other cats with flat-faces/noses are more likely to have crowding issues, and as a result, the teeth are harder to clean. Your veterinarian can recommend an in-clinic dental cleaning to thoroughly clean spots that a toothbrush can’t reach.

While especially important for short-nosed breeds, dental cleanings play a big role in the health of your furry family member. In-clinic cleanings increase your pet’s quality of life by preventing the pain and tooth loss associated with dental disease. Just like when humans go to the dentist, we also take dental X-rays which give us a more complete picture of your pet’s oral health.

One of the easiest ways to prevent dental disease is to try a diet with a dental focus. There are many products available that have been specifically formulated to remove plaque through the physical motion of chewing, unlike traditional foods which are more likely to cause plaque than remove it.

Whether you introduce your kitty to dental cat food or simply supplement his or her existing diet with dental treats, your cat’s teeth will thank you! Not only might you notice a difference in the appearance of the teeth, but the whole family can enjoy your furry friend’s fresher breath!

BRUSHING YOUR PETS TEETH

Sometimes, starting with a toothbrush can be overwhelming for a cat or dog who isn’t used to the experience. There are many different ways to introduce a furry friend to an oral health routine and it may take some trial and error to find one that works for you.

  • Don’t force the toothbrush into the mouth. Try gently massaging the lips and rewarding your pet with treats. This will help him or her to associate the toothbrush with a positive experience! Over several days or sessions, eventually, try the toothbrush on the front teeth and then work back.

  • If the cat or dog does not accept the toothbrush, try picking up a tube of toothpaste for pets and some latex gloves. Put a small amount of toothpaste on your finger and allow him or her to lick it off. The next day, try gently inserting your finger with toothpaste into the mouth, and if possible, massaging the gums. Once your cat or dog is comfortable with this routine, it will be easier to transition to a toothbrush with toothpaste.

  • Encourage licking and chewing the toothbrush! Don’t expect your furry family member to stay still enough for you to stroke every tooth. It may start out messy, but it will get easier. Many pets learn to enjoy getting their teeth brushed!

IMPORTANT NOTE:

Be very slow and gentle when introducing a dental routine. Any animal that receives minimum oral stimulation may have very sensitive gums. Brushing too hard may cause pain, which will cause a negative association with the toothbrush. Over time, your furry family member will be able to tolerate more pressure and longer sessions.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact us and we will be happy to help!

Dermatology

Skin problems are common in dogs and cats and can be caused by hormonal disorders, allergies, infections, or parasites such as fleas and mites. These issues can be difficult to treat and should be addressed promptly for the health and comfort of your furry family member.

We can often diagnose a skin problem by simply examining your pet. Some dermatologic diseases or conditions do require additional diagnostic procedures to ensure a correct diagnosis. Depending on your pet’s symptoms and the results of our physical exam, we may run blood tests or perform a urinalysis, skin scraping, or biopsies, or recommend a diet trial.

Some causes of itchiness in your furry little one, such as a flea infestation, can also affect your home and your family. Contact us if you notice your dog or cat scratching excessively or if they develop any bare patches, scabs, scaling, redness, inflammation, lumps, or bumps.

Dog and Cat Boarding

There are times when we have to leave town and simply cannot take our furry little ones with us.
We always recommend trying to find a friend or family member to care for your pets in the comfort of your own home. Seeing a familiar face in the environment that they are used to reduces the stress of their parents not being around. If your family, friends, and trusted neighbours are not available, the next best option would be to find in-home pet sitters.

You are welcome to contact us at Neighbourhood Pet Clinic to arrange for in-home day visits with your furry little one. If you are looking for overnight pet sitters, members of our team are often available to help or would be happy to provide their own personal recommendations for other pet sitters in the city.

HOME VISITS

If your furry family member needs some extra socialization and exercise, potty breaks, or food or medication during the day, one of the Neighbourhood Pet Clinic team members would be happy to visit them in the comfort of your own home. Contact us for more information!

PET BOARDING AT NEIGHBOURHOOD PET CLINIC

If you think that your furry family member would have fun at a boarding facility while you are away, feel free to contact us for more information on various facilities in and around London. Many members of our team have personal experience with different facilities and would be happy to point you in the right direction based on your pet’s needs.

Both Neighbourhood Pet Clinic locations offer cat boarding and dog day-boarding, however we are not able to provide overnight dog-boarding at this time. Contact us with any questions you may have, to book your boarding dates, or stop by for a tour of our facilities.

All furry family members that visit Neighbourhood Pet Clinic for any length of time need to be fully up to date on vaccinations. For cats, this includes the FVRCP and Rabies vaccines, and for dogs, the DA2PP and Rabies vaccines.

CAT BOARDING

We have a separate “cat room” in both of our facilities, which is solely used for feline family members. It is soundproofed and air-conditioned so that they are comfortable during their stay. Our feline boarding friends are usually seen lounging on the windowsill, soaking up the sun while the radio plays for them. We provide all of the essentials including clean and comfortable bedding, food and water bowls, a litterbox, and lots of cuddles! Along with food, treats, and medications, we recommend that you also bring a comfort item or bed from home for that familiar smell. We can provide food (at an extra charge) if your feline family member is on a diet that we carry at the clinic. If you leave us a cell phone number or email address that we can reach you at during your time away from the city, we would be happy to send you picture updates!

DOG DAY-CARE

We have spacious, comfortable dog runs that have been designed with the crate-loathing dog in mind. The doors are tempered safety glass instead of bars for 3 reasons- our canine friends feel like they are looking out of a window so their stay is much more comfortable, the glass prevents injuries that often occur when dogs jump up on bar doors, and they allow us to fully disinfect each run between furry visitors. We provide clean and comfortable bedding, food and water bowls, potty breaks, and lots of cuddles! Along with food, treats, and medications, we recommend that you also bring a safe toy or bed from home to keep them that much more comfortable throughout the day.

Breeding

Looking to improve conception rates in your breeding program?

We can assist you in determining the optimum time to breed your dogs to enhance the success of pregnancy. By taking a swab of the vaginal cells of the female dog, we can analyze the cells in order to calculate their stage of estrus. We can also perform a simple blood test to determine the luteinizing hormone (LH) surge and pinpoint the female’s fertile period. Additional tests, including a thyroid analysis, should be performed before estrus to rule out any potential problems or alert us to issues that need to be addressed before breeding.

PET PREGNANCY AND DELIVERY PROCESS

After a successful timed breeding and pregnancy, the next step is planning for delivery of the litter. While most animals give birth without any complications, some occasionally need assistance with this step. We try to resolve the problem using medical therapy first, but when that doesn’t solve the issue, we will perform a caesarean section.

During a c-section, the mother is given an anesthetic. An incision is then made along her abdomen and through the uterus to retrieve unborn puppies or kittens. In some situations, we may recommend that the mother be spayed during this procedure, usually to prevent future problems of this nature.

Creepy Crawlies - Parasite Prevention

Prevention is much easier and healthier than treatment!

When your furry family member comes in for a wellness exam one of the major topics that the veterinarian will discuss with you is preventative medicine. We will ask you questions about your furry little one’s lifestyle so that we can assess their exposure to certain risk factors. Vaccines are an effective way to prevent many common viruses and some bacteria and anti-parasitic medications can prevent and treat different parasitic infestations. Heartworms, fleas, ticks, and other internal and external parasites are much more than just pests, they can cause life-threatening conditions in both your furry and human family members. The medications that we use require a prescription, which means that our veterinary team has to have seen your furry family member for a physical exam within the past year. This is a legal requirement for all veterinary clinics dispensing prescription medications.

Contact us to learn more about different preventive options, to refill a prescription or to book an appointment with a veterinarian to start a preventive regimen.

FLEA CONTROL SERVICES

The most common flea found on cats and dogs is the cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis), although any species of fleas, including fleas from rabbits, squirrels or other wildlife, can be found on your furry family members. Adult fleas get carried into your house by your furry little ones where they thrive in carpets and bedding. Even though fleas may be in your house, you probably won’t see them. The eggs are tiny white specks the size of dust particles, while the larvae, which are somewhat larger, with dark heads and lighter bodies, migrate deep down in carpets, furniture or cracks in floors away from the light.

Flea bites cause severe itching for both your furry and human family members. Some animals develop an allergy to flea bites, especially if they are repeatedly bitten. Fleas are also the intermediate host for one species of tapeworm which is transmitted when a dog or cat swallows an infected flea while grooming, so any furry little one with fleas likely also has a tapeworm infestation.

If you would like to get your furry family member on a flea prevention medication, or if you need flea treatment for your furry little one and your house, please contact us today.

HEARTWORM PREVENTION

Mosquitoes can transmit heartworms when they bite our feline and canine friends. These parasites can severely and sometimes fatally damage the heart, lungs, and blood vessels. Some pets may not show any signs of infection, but in those that do, symptoms can vary widely. In dogs, signs of heartworm disease include coughing, fatigue, weight loss, difficulty breathing and a swollen abdomen (caused by fluid accumulation from heart failure). Canine heartworm infection can also lead to a life-threatening complication called “caval syndrome” (a form of liver failure); without prompt surgical intervention, this condition usually causes death. When cats get a heartworm infection they can suffer from a syndrome referred to as heartworm-associated respiratory disease (HARD). The symptoms of HARD can be subtle and may mimic those of asthma or allergic bronchitis. Signs of respiratory distress, such as rapid or difficult breathing, wheezing, and panting, are common. Other symptoms include coughing, vomiting (typically unrelated to eating), and decreased appetite or weight loss. Heartworm infection is more difficult to diagnose in cats than it is in dogs.

Treatment for heartworm infection in dogs is far more expensive than prevention, and the treatment itself can be fatal. There is no approved treatment for cats. Some cats spontaneously rid themselves of the infection, while others might not survive it. Fortunately, there are ways to prevent heartworm infestations. We are lucky that mosquitoes are only out pestering us in the summer months so our typical prevention regimens run from June to November. If your pet travels with you we may recommend year-long prevention.

TICK PREVENTION

Ticks are becoming more and more prevalent in North America, which is not only a nuisance but also a major health concern for people and pets. Tick bites can cause serious diseases including Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, and tick paralysis. There are 3 steps in preventing tick-transmitted diseases. The first is having your furry little one on a tick preventative medication. Talk to our veterinary team to find a medication that would work best for your canine or feline family members. The second line of defense is checking your pet (and yourself) for ticks and safely removing them before they have a chance to transmit diseases. It is a good habit to check for hitchhiking creepy crawlies, especially after walks or playing outside in wooded areas. The third step applies specifically to the transmission of Lyme disease by deer ticks. The Lyme vaccine is one of the optional vaccinations that our clinic offers; talk to our veterinary team to see if this is a good option for your canine family member.

Don’t panic if you find a tick on your dog or cat, even if they are on a preventive, as some medications require the tick to bite in order to work. Grab a pair of gloves, tweezers or a tick remover, and a sealable container with some rubbing alcohol in it. Put the gloves on and using the tweezers or tick remover, grab the tick as close to your pet’s skin as possible and pull it out using a straight motion. Do not twist or squeeze the tick as you don’t want to leave any mouthparts behind or push fluids from the tick into your pet. Once removed, place the tick in the sealed container with rubbing alcohol. We recommend that you either bring it into the clinic for us to ID or keep it at home in case your pet begins displaying symptoms of disease. It is important to remove ticks as soon as you find them to prevent the transmission of disease – they can start transmitting pathogens within 24 hours after they bite. If you are uncomfortable removing a tick from your pet, contact us and we would be happy to help.

Diet and Nutrition

Imagine if you ate the same meal day in and day out; the ingredients in that meal would need to provide you with all of the nutrients that you need.

Hopefully, you can appreciate why your furry little one’s diet needs to be complete and balanced! Choosing an appropriate diet can set your pet on a path of lifelong good nutrition and help prevent many problems, including allergies, nutritional deficiencies, skin and coat disorders, and obesity. Nutritional requirements for dogs and cats vary depending on a variety of factors, including age, breed, and health. For instance, senior pets have different requirements than puppies or kittens, and animals with diabetes, kidney disease, and other health conditions can benefit from specific diets.

Our veterinarians are here to help you make informed decisions about your pet’s diet. Contact us to set up a nutrition consultation for your furry little one.

DIET AND NUTRITION FOR LARGE DOG BREEDS

Giant dog breeds such as Great Danes, Irish Wolfhounds, and Giant Schnauzers have unique dietary requirements. Very few commercial puppy foods offer the ideal mix of calcium, energy, and protein levels that these breeds need. We can provide you with feeding recommendations that will ensure your growing puppy is getting a well-balanced diet with the specific nutrient levels required for a giant breed. We want your puppy to grow to its full potential, but at a pace that won’t cause developmental issues. Once your puppy is full-grown it will still require a diet that is specialized for a giant breed dog.

Diet and Nutrition for Large Dog Breeds

Please contact us if you have any questions or concerns regarding your dog’s nutritional needs at any stage of life. The veterinary team will discuss diet with you during your canine family member’s annual physical examination, but if you have questions between visits please don’t hesitate to contact us.

DIET AND NUTRITION FOR SMALL DOGS, PUPPIES, AND KITTENS

It is easy to get overwhelmed by all of the pet food options on the market when choosing a diet for your new puppy or kitten. There are many different brands, ingredients, nutrient profiles, and types of diets available for your furry little one. It is extremely important to get your new furry family member off to a good start by selecting a diet that will meet their growing body’s nutritional needs.

When you come in for your new puppy/kitten’s first visit to the clinic, feel free to bring in the bag/can of food that your furry little one is eating for a veterinarian to look at. We will be able to tell you if that diet is well-balanced and meets the nutritional needs of your little one, and if it is, how much to feed your furry family member each day.

Feel free to contact us with any nutrition questions or concerns you might have.

Drive Through Pet Food and Pharmacy

As crazy as it sounds, we actually have a drive thru.

Whether you’re coming in to drop off your pet for a groom or surgery, need food or simple have a question, why not use this convenient option? Our pet clinic offers convenient drive-through services and is completely covered keeping you sheltered during unpleasant weather.

CONVENIENT DRIVE-THROUGH VETERINARY SERVICES

With direct access to our park-themed main reception area, you’ll enjoy the convenience of parking, taking one step and being inside. What could be easier for everyone involved?

Health Screening

VON WILLEBRAND’S DISEASE

Similar to haemophilia in humans, von Willebrand’s disease is an inherited condition that can result in life-threatening bleeding. Knowing if your dog has this disease before an emergency situation arises can mean the difference between life and death. Many go undetected until a minor surgery or a superficial injury results in significant blood loss. To avoid a minor issue becoming a big problem, we recommend that breeds with a higher incidence of this disease get tested. As many as 50% of Dobermans are affected; other commonly affected breeds include German shepherds, German shorthaired and wirehaired pointers, golden and Chesapeake Bay retrievers, Pembroke Welsh corgis, poodles, Scottish and Manchester terriers, and Shetland sheepdogs. Some animals show no signs of the disease but are genetic carriers of it, which means that they can pass it on to their offspring if they are allowed to reproduce. It is strongly recommended that all breeders test their dogs for von Willebrand’s disease. If you are interested in learning more or would like to schedule a screening test for your dog, please contact us.

RENAL DYSPLASIA

Renal dysplasia is a genetic disorder in which the kidneys do not develop normally. Most dogs become clinically ill with symptoms of kidney failure before 1 year of age. Management options are limited and are generally expensive. Although some dogs are only carriers of this disorder and have normal kidney function, they can still pass the trait onto their offspring. It most commonly affects Shih Tzus, Lhasa apsos, and soft-coated wheaten terriers. We strongly recommend testing for this disorder in dogs involved in a breeding program, especially those that are one of the at-risk breeds.

HIP DYSPLASIA

Canine hip dysplasia begins when the hip joint in a young dog becomes loose or unstable, resulting in abnormal development of the hip joint. If left undiagnosed and untreated, this instability causes abnormal wear of the hip cartilage and ultimately progresses to osteoarthritis or degenerative joint disease. Signs of this condition are pain, reluctance to get up or exercise, difficulty climbing stairs, a “bunny-hopping” gait, limping, and lameness, especially after periods of inactivity or exercise.

Hip dysplasia most commonly affects large- and giant-breed dogs; however, smaller dogs can also be affected. Although genetics often play a role in this disorder, young dogs that grow or gain weight too quickly or get too much high-impact exercise are also at risk. Being overweight can aggravate hip dysplasia.

We can help prevent or slow this condition by monitoring food intake and ensuring that your dog gets proper exercise as he or she ages. We can also screen your dog for hip dysplasia; the earlier we can diagnose hip dysplasia, the better the possible outcome for your dog. Screening methods include:

OFA (Orthopedic Foundation for Animals) Certification

We can x-ray your dog’s hips for hip dysplasia at 2 years of age. We will forward these radiographs to the OFA, where board-certified radiologists will evaluate and grade your dog’s hips for OFA certification. Correct positioning of your dog is essential for proper radiographic evaluation, so a general anesthetic is required.

Please contact us to discuss your dog’s risk of developing hip dysplasia, to schedule a screening, or to discuss treatment options.

To find out more about pet screening and to schedule a screening test for your dog, contact our team of veterinary experts for more information.

Microchip Identification

Losing a pet is a terrifying experience that every owner dreads.

Putting an ID tag on your pet’s collar with your contact information is a great way for individuals to reach you if needed. However, collars sometimes break or slip off, so a more reliable form of identification is a microchip. Microchipping is a safe, permanent way to identify your furry family member.

EASILY LOCATE YOUR PET USING MICROCHIP TECHNOLOGY

A microchip is a tiny device about the size and shape of a grain of rice that is placed just under the loose skin at the back of the neck. When a lost dog or cat without an ID tag is found and brought into a veterinary clinic or shelter, a handheld microchip scanner is used to look for a microchip. If one has been implanted it will transmit the unique ID number to the scanner via a low-frequency radio wave, which allows the veterinary hospital or shelter to retrieve the pet owner’s contact information.

Although we hope your pet never becomes lost, we want you to be prepared. The best time to have this procedure done is when your furry little one comes in for their spay or neuter so we can implant the microchip when they are under general anesthesia. If this is not an option, we give local anesthetic so that the implantation is not painful.

Radiology

X-rays provide valuable information about a pet’s bones, gastrointestinal tract (stomach, intestines, colon), respiratory tract (lungs), heart, and genitourinary system (bladder, prostate). We use radiology alone or in conjunction with other diagnostic tools to help identify the reason for your pet’s clinical signs, rule out possible issues, or provide a list of potential causes. Interpretation of radiographs requires great skill on the part of the veterinarian, and sometimes further imaging techniques are needed for a better idea of what’s going on inside of your pet.

Neighbourhood pet Clinic offers digital radiology (x-rays that are captured digitally rather than on film) to provide us with a faster diagnosis for your furry family member. To avoid a blurry image, pets need to remain completely still while an x-ray is taken, so we may need to use sedation or a short-acting general anesthesia on your furry little one.

Referrals

Our goal is to ensure that our furry patients are as healthy and happy as they can be, and sometimes achieving that requires specialist attention.
Our team of veterinarians and veterinary technicians provides many services at our clinic, ranging from routine to advanced procedures. Although we handle the majority of your pet’s medical and surgical needs in-house, we occasionally refer patients to veterinary specialists when advanced training or equipment will be beneficial.

SPECIALIZED AND ADVANCED PET CARE

Board-certified specialists, such as oncologists, ophthalmologists, and neurologists, have extensive experience and training in a particular area of veterinary medicine or surgery. Specialty clinics and university-affiliated referral centers have specialized equipment to perform procedures that are not routinely performed by general veterinary practitioners.

When we refer one of our patients to another hospital we continue to stay involved in their care by communicating with the specialist, with you, and often by providing any needed follow-up care and rehabilitation.

Retail, Food, and Pharmacy

PET FOOD

We carry a variety of pet supplies and food to provide you with a selection of safe, veterinarian-approved diets, supplements, treats, toys, and accessories. If you are looking for an item for your pet, feel free to visit us at either one of our pet clinics, or contact us by phone or email and we would be happy to help.

SUPPLIES AND PRESCRIPTIONS

We carry common medications in our on-site pharmacy that we dispense to our clients with a veterinarian prescription. We are also able to special order or send prescriptions to pharmacies for those medications that we do not regularly keep in stock.

Surgery

Our veterinarians provide many surgical services at our clinic, ranging from routine spays and neuters to advanced orthopedic and soft tissue procedures. We want to ensure that our patients receive the best possible outcome, so if your furry little one needs to undergo a complex procedure that requires advanced equipment or training that we cannot provide, we will refer them to a specialist.

THINGS TO REMEMBER ON THE DAY OF SURGERY

On the morning of your furry family member’s surgery, the veterinarian performing the procedure will do a comprehensive physical examination. Based on your furry little one’s age, health status, and other exam findings they may also request pre-anesthetic blood work to have a better idea of what’s going on internally. The findings from our hands-on exam, as well as the blood test results, tell us if surgery is a safe option for your furry little one, and if it is, which drugs are the best choice for them. The type of anesthesia we use depends on the procedure, as some require general anesthetic while others only need sedation with a local anesthetic.

THE NEIGHBOURHOOD PET CLINIC DIFFERENCE

Our veterinary team takes every precaution to ensure that your furry family member is safe at all times. This begins with the thorough physical examination and laboratory tests and carries through to the specific drug selection for your pet, patient monitoring throughout surgery and in recovery, and any required aftercare. We provide pain medication to each surgical patient before the procedure so they are comfortable when they wake up. If you have any questions or would like to learn more, please contact us, our veterinary team would be happy to give you more specific information on our protocols.

PATIENT MONITORING

Patient monitoring begins before we even enter the operating room. Baseline vital signs, physical examination findings, blood work results, and the type of procedure help the veterinary team determine the best anesthetic plan for your furry little one. During the procedure a veterinary technician monitors your pet’s heart and respiratory rate, blood pressure, body temperature, and oxygen saturation. They look for trends in your pet’s vital signs and adjust anesthetic depth accordingly to keep your furry little one safe and pain-free. Monitoring continues when your little one is in recovery up until the time that they are ready to go home.

GENERAL ANESTHESIA

Some procedures, such as spays, neuters, dental cleanings, and other invasive surgeries, require your pet to be under general anesthetic. Just like when people go in for surgery, we take every precaution to ensure our patients are safe and pain-free. This process begins with a thorough physical examination, pre-anesthetic blood work, and monitoring baseline vital signs. We administer a sedative to help your furry little one relax before placing an IV catheter. We then give an intravenous drug through the IV catheter to provide anesthesia before placing a breathing tube into their trachea. The breathing tube delivers a mixture of oxygen and gas anesthetic to maintain unconsciousness for the surgical procedure. The veterinary technician is solely focused on monitoring your pet’s vital parameters and adjusting the amount of gas anesthetic your furry family member inhales throughout the entire procedure.

Please contact us if you have any questions or concerns about your pet receiving general anesthesia or about the procedure for which your pet is scheduled.

LOCAL ANESTHESIA

We may need to use a local anesthetic if your furry family member is having a minor surgical or diagnostic procedure performed. These drugs cause a loss of sensation in the area that they are injected. We sometimes use a sedative and/or anxiolytic (anti-anxiety medication) in combination with the local anesthetic to keep pets calm during a procedure.

Tonometry (Vision)

It is crucial for your pet’s vision that we detect and treat glaucoma and other problems with intraocular pressure (pressure within the eye) as quickly as possible. We can test your furry little one’s eyes for excess pressure using a tonometer, which is an instrument that does not cause your pet any discomfort and does not require sedation.

If not treated immediately (within hours to days), glaucoma can cause permanent vision loss or even blindness. Furry family members that have suffered eye injuries should have this test performed. And for certain breeds that are prone to developing glaucoma, we recommend visiting us for regular measurements so we can monitor eye pressure and begin treatment before any problem becomes irreversible. Please contact us to discuss whether your pet may be at a higher risk for glaucoma.

Contact us right away if you notice anything abnormal with your furry little one’s eyes such as:

  • Dilated (enlarged) pupils
  • Clouding of the cornea (the normally clear outer layer of the eye)
  • Red or bloodshot eyes
  • One eye protruding or appearing larger than the other
  • Squinting or tearing
  • Glaucoma is painful so your pet may react by rubbing or pawing at their eyes or rubbing their head against the floor or furniture more than normal

Contact us to book an appointment with a veterinarian if your pet is exhibiting any of the above signs or if you would like more information on tonometry testing.

Wellness For All Life Stages

Furry family members age much faster than people, so significant changes in their health can happen very quickly.
Wellness programs allow us to diagnose conditions early, when they’re easier to treat or manage, and we can often prevent diseases entirely with regular physical exams, vaccinations, and preventatives. We recommend that healthy adult dogs and cats visit us once a year, whereas puppies, kittens, senior pets, and pets with health issues need more frequent checkups.

Our veterinarians will work with you to create a wellness program that fits the needs of your furry little one. Contact us to learn more about our vaccination schedules, preventative protocols, and what to expect when you visit us for a wellness exam.

PUPPY WELLNESS

Congratulations on your new puppy! Thank you for considering us as a partner in the care of your new furry family member.

We welcome you to bring your furry little one in for a visit, even if it’s just for a walk through our park. Introducing your puppy to new places and people is extremely important for their socialization during the first few weeks in their new home. Positive experiences with car rides, new faces, and different noises, sights and smells help your furry little one grow into a happy, well-adjusted adult. We are always here to provide you with the support and tools necessary to help you with your new pup, including information and advice on healthcare, nutrition, training, behaviour, and socialization.

Our puppy wellness program is designed to help get your puppy started on the right path to a long and healthy life. Your new puppy needs extra protection while their young immune system is still developing. Until your furry little one has received a series of vaccines they are susceptible to many serious but preventable diseases. It is highly recommended that you book an appointment for your new family member as soon as you bring them home so the veterinarian can perform a comprehensive physical exam. During this appointment, the veterinarian will discuss vaccinations, parasite testing, and prevention, nutrition, and will answer any questions that you have. We vaccinate against rabies, distemper, adenovirus, parainfluenza, and parvovirus, and depending on different activities that you plan on doing with your pup, we may also vaccinate against some bacteria as well.

Most puppies have roundworms, which are intestinal worms that can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and other gastrointestinal signs (although dogs can have worms without showing any symptoms). It is important for puppies to be treated for roundworms both for their health and for the health of you and your family. Roundworms are a zoonotic parasite, which means they can be transmitted from pets to people. By ensuring that your puppy is treated, you can keep your entire family safe from these and other parasites.

If you have any questions or would like to book an appointment please call, email, or request an appointment online. We look forward to meeting your new furry family member!

KITTEN WELLNESS

Congratulations on your new kitten! Thank you for choosing us to help protect and care for your new furry family member.

Our kitten wellness program is designed to help get your kitten started on the right path to a long and healthy life. The first few months are a critical period in your kitten’s development, and we can give you the support and tools necessary to help your furry little one grow into a well-mannered, healthy cat, including information and advice on nutrition, litterbox training, and behaviour.

It is highly recommended that you book an appointment for your new family member as soon as you bring them home so the veterinarian can perform a comprehensive physical exam. During this appointment, the veterinarian will discuss vaccinations, parasite testing, and prevention, nutrition, and will answer any questions that you have. Until your kitten has received a series of vaccines they are susceptible to many serious but preventable diseases. We vaccinate kittens against rabies, feline rhinotracheitis, calicivirus, and panleukopenia. Depending on your cat’s risk, we may also advise vaccinating against feline leukemia virus (FeLV).

Most kittens have roundworms, which are intestinal worms that can cause coughing, weight loss, and a potbellied appearance in cats (although they may not cause any symptoms). It is important for kittens to be treated for roundworms, not only to help rid them of the infection but also to prevent you and the rest of your family from becoming infected. Roundworms are a zoonotic parasite, which means they can be transmitted from pets to people. By ensuring that your kitten is treated, you can keep your entire family safe.

If you have any questions or would like to book an appointment please call, email, or request an appointment online. We look forward to meeting your new furry family member!

ADULT PET WELLNESS

During your pet’s wellness exam we will perform a physical assessment, checking your furry little one from nose to tail, and discuss vaccinations, preventatives, nutrition, behaviour, and oral hygiene. Dogs and cats age faster than humans so it is even more crucial that they receive regular veterinary attention.

The risks of arthritis, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, hormone disorders, and kidney and liver problems all increase with age. Annual physical exams allow us to detect hidden conditions early, which can improve the prognosis of many diseases. Many of our furry little ones are good at hiding signs that something is wrong, so subtle changes in their health or behaviour might be easy to overlook. Comprehensive physical assessments in combination with wellness diagnostics help give us an overall picture of what’s going on inside your pet. Performing a baseline diagnostic workup is also a good idea when your furry family member is an adult as it tells us what is normal for them. This will alert us to any changes that take place during their senior years.

Please let us know if you’ve noticed any physical or behavioural changes in your pet, as well as any other concerns you might have. To book an appointment please call, email, or request an appointment online.

SENIOR PET WELLNESS

As dogs and cats get older they need more attention and special care. Our senior wellness program can help your pet remain healthy as they age and allow us to catch any potential problems earlier when they’re easier to treat or manage. Diagnosing diseases and certain conditions early is important at any stage of life, but it becomes even more critical during a furry family member’s senior years. The risks of arthritis, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, hormone disorders, and kidney and liver problems all increase with age. Physical examinations and diagnostic tests become critical for elderly pets, especially since many do not show any signs of feeling unwell, even with serious diseases, until they are advanced.

Senior status varies depending on breed and size. Smaller dogs tend to have a longer life-span than larger dogs, and cats generally live longer than dogs. Before your furry family member reaches senior status we recommend bringing them in for a baseline exam and diagnostic workup. This will tell us what is normal for them so that we can keep track of any changes and trends as they age. We can help you determine what life stage your pet is in, but in most cases, we suggest a baseline checkup for dogs over 7 years old and cats over the age of 8.

Senior pets benefit from more frequent veterinary exams and diagnostic testing. Once we know what is going on inside your furry family member we can help manage many symptoms that are commonly attributed to age, including those associated with cognitive dysfunction syndrome (similar to Alzheimer’s in humans) and mobility challenges. Maximizing your senior pet’s quality of life is our main goal. This can be accomplished in many ways – by identifying and preventing or reducing pain, recommending a nutrition and exercise plan, and suggesting environmental modifications.

We look forward to working with furry little ones at all stages of life. As a partner in your pet’s well-being, we want to make sure that your senior furry family member is able to age in comfort and good health. If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment please contact us by phone, email, or request an appointment online.

Contact Us

Phone: 519-649-0080
Email: parkranger@neighbourhoodpetclinic.com

Mon-Fri: 8am – 7pm
Sat: 9am – 4pm
Sun: Closed

In-Home Services
City of London
Available during Clinic Hours

We are always open on long weekend Saturdays. Our clinic is closed on Statutory Holidays and Sunday only. We look forward to meeting your furry little one.

Westmount Neighbourhood Pet Clinic

(corner of Wonderland Road South & Viscount Road)
851 Wonderland Road South
London, Ontario N6K 4T2
Canada
Click here for directions.

North London Neighbourhood Pet Clinic

(corner of Waterloo & Oxford)
746 Waterloo Street
London, Ontario N6A 3W3
Canada
Click here for directions.

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